Autoimmune Awareness – Addison’s Disease

The adrenals are two triangular-shaped glands that lie above each kidney and are approximately the size of your thumb.  The hormones that are secreted from the adrenals include cortisol, adrenaline and aldosterone. These hormones help to regulate metabolism, blood pressure, and the body’s response to stress. Another hormone produced by the adrenal glands, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), is used to make androgens and estrogens, the sex hormones.

Adrenal insufficiency is a disorder that happens when the adrenals do not produce enough of these hormones. Addison’s is the name used to describe primary adrenal insufficiency when the glands are damaged and do not produce enough cortisol and aldosterone.

 When these glands are physically damaged and no longer function properly, we call this Addison’s Disease.

The adrenal glands in people who have Addison’s disease are not functioning properly. Adrenal insufficiency is a disorder that happens when the adrenals do not produce enough of these hormones. Addison’s is the name used to describe primary adrenal insufficiency when the glands are damaged and do not produce enough cortisol and aldosterone. Secondary adrenal insufficiency occurs when other glands such as the pituitary gland (a gland in the endocrine system located near the base of the brain) does not produce enough of its hormone (ACTH) that stimulates the adrenals to produce cortisol. If the ACTH is too low the adrenal glands can stop producing cortisol and may shrink in size. This secondary adrenal insufficiency is more common than Addison’s disease.

 

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is also produced by the adrenals and is used to make androgen and estrogen (male and female sex hormones). Men get most androgens from the testes and women get most of their estrogen from the ovaries. When adrenal insufficiency exists, the glands may not make enough DHEA.

 

The most common symptoms of adrenal insufficiency include:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Muscle weakness
  • Abdominal pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss

Other symptoms of the disease may include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Low blood pressure that may cause dizziness or fainting with standing
  • Irritability and depression
  • Headache
  • Sweating
  • Skin darkening on scars, skin folds, lips, elbows, knees, knuckles, toes, and mucous membranes of the cheek. This hyperpigmentation occurs only in Addison’s and not in secondary adrenal insufficiency.
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  • Craving salty foods
  • Irregular or nonexistent menstrual periods
  • Loss of interest in sex in women

Most cases of Addison’s disease are caused by autoimmune disorders.

*https://adrenalfatiguesolution.com/addisons-disease/*

Cryotherapy – tell me all about it!

  • aipcommunity❄️Have you tried cryotherapy yet? Today I went to US Cryotherapy in San Ramon (next to Total Wines&Sprouts) and gave it a try. I woke up inflamed and my back was not at its’ finest, so it was a great time to put it to the test. I spent some time chatting with the owner and GM about my health and concerns. I was cleared to do the chamber, and all the extras that come with the service: hydrotable, Normatec for the legs and localized freezing. My back is 100% back to good. It was rejuvenating and I wish I could take each and every one of you to try it! For our local peeps I was able to lock in a deal $29 – for all above mentioned services, always!  Here’s the link:
  • https://store.uscryotherapy.com/viafria/danville/product/6ede5b22e194d664f84f1a90304bffa2

 

Fitness Friday – Be More Human

Hello AIP Community!

How’s the burpee challenge going?  They should be getting much easier by now, and your capacity should be growing significantly! 

A few days ago, Tim and I took the car in for an oil change and did something out of the ordinary, we left the car there and walked to the chiropractor for our weekly tune up.  What a simple idea, a little over a mile round trip, but out walking nonetheless.  On the way back to get the car I felt different.  There was something so nice and natural about being out walking.  I felt more human.  We rarely go anywhere without our car because time is such a precious thing, and our to-do lists are always pages long.  But that day, we decided that we’d let it all go, and enjoy a slower paced morning and get some fresh air.  It was delightful!

CrossFit lauched their “Be More Human” slogan sometime last year if I’m not mistaken, suggesting that CrossFitters get out of their boxes and go outside to play.  Ski, swim, bike, run, hike, etc.  I loved their message, but back when it came out I was so busy working on recovering my health, being a mommy and running our CrossFit gym, that I couldn’t find time to “Be more human.”  How ironic, the one thing I needed, I was too busy for.

The goal for all of us this weekend, starting today -Fitness Friday, is to be more human.  Unplug from daily life – I said it – leave the electronics behind for a while.  Choose from any of the following activities that will get you moving and out in the sunshine a bit:

Walking, Riding a bike, Swimming, Running, Jogging, go to a Farmers Market, Water Skiing, Rafting, wake boarding, paddle boating, row boat, play at the park with your kids, Kick a soccer ball around at the park, dance…you get where I’m going with this!

Accountability: Today I’m walking to the gym, working out, then walking to meet Kat for tea and some AIP work.  Then Tim and I are taking Ashleigh to family camp, Camp Augusta, for the weekend where there is no cell signal and no where to plug in electronics…and we’re going to dance, swim, hike, play, climb, zip line, do yoga, make lip balm, etc.  I’ve put it out there, and I’m sticking to it!  No barbells, no Metcons, no TV, no Computer, no Pokemon Go, no work – I’m going to focus on being more human, and my wish is that you do to!

Signing off until Monday,

Coach Lori

 

AI Awareness – Celiac Disease

Hello AIP Community!

I’m not one to reinvent the wheel, here’s our post about Celiac Disease from our Instagram account. 🙂

When your child displays Autoimmune symptoms

So this topic is one I hold close to my heart.  At age 2 1/2 we took our daughter off gluten to see if it would help with her bowel withholding.  Note that 7 years ago I was not gluten free, and I didn’t have much understanding as to what it was, or why we should eliminate it from her diet.   What’s bowel withholding?  In short, sometimes Ash would hold in her poop for upwards of a week, and then when she could no longer hold it she would scream bloody murder, it was an extremely painful experience until the next time.  I would worry that a neighbor would call the police – it hurt her that badly and she screamed that loudly.

So back to gluten removal – I took her off breads and crackers and all the things little kids love.  I learned quickly how to make gluten free things and buy pre-made gluten free items.  Again, I didn’t realize that the sugars, corn, rice, etc. used in gluten free products was bad back then.

Ash did much better, and between the gluten free living, and my making up bathroom songs like “Pooping is fun,”  ” I love to poop,” and Bye Bye Turds,” she was able to get to every other day bowel movements.  A huge improvement, and it helped us avoid all the invasive, terrifying testing her Dr wanted to do.  I was pleased with the progress, and she was no longer scared to poop.

Personally, I went back and forth to gluten free and gluten full – and when I went 100% Paleo, Ash was 5.  I finally understood nutrition and  I worked tirelessly to make foods that she enjoyed in a healthier version.  Every birthday party she attended I sent her with paleo cake, and paleo pizza (or whatever food the other kids were eating).  Seriously, I did.  When her father and I divorced, she ate healthy with me and crappy with him.  I could always tell when she had gluten because she’d get pink circles under her eyes, and cough and wheeze all night and have IBS.  Her clothes would fit on Friday when she went to her dads, and when she came home Sunday, she couldn’t button her pants.  (keep in mind, she’s 5 at this point).  Finally through a court order he had to keep her gluten free, and to the best of his knowledge he did, not realizing soy sauce, chicken broth and other basic items usually have wheat in them.  So the struggle continued.

When Ash was in 2nd grade she developed cold uticaria – meaning if she got too cold she’d would be covered in hives.  She was in the nurses office 3-4 times a week during school.  It was AWFUL and no one could tell me what was happening.  Kaiser did a blood panel and said she was fine.  Obviously she was not.  I pleaded with her doctor to do something, and he said to try taking dairy out of her diet.  We did, and amazingly enough, she started doing really well.  So my 7 year old is gluten and dairy intolerant, we can handle this.  But WHY is my child having such issues?  And why are the hives not completely gone?

Ash is now 9 1/2.  Her health is a battle.  She has all the signs of hypoglycemia, her weight is constantly fluctuating, no matter how much she sleeps she’s fatigued, her hives came back this summer and her mood is all over the place too.  She reminds me of me when I was diagnosed with a thyroid issue.   The need to get a hold on whatever is going on before she hits puberty is crucial, and I find that her health is the #1 cause of stress in my life.  I research, and spend hours cooking for her, removing toxins from her life, keeping her childhood as normal as can be.

So today, I emailed my NP and asked if we should do a blood draw and check her thyroid and other key markers to look for autoimmune disease, namely thyroid.  And then I sent Kat a text and I told her that I just emailed my NP and asked what we should test Ash for – Thyroid, fasting glucose, etc. and that I felt Bananas about it.  I was reading what I was writing and felt like an idiot – and I KNOW about all these health issues…and I STILL felt this way.  And Kat text me back and it was this moment of clarity….see the text below:

This text exchange is a reminder that

1. We need to be proactive and work with NPs when MDs don’t get us answers.  Find the WHY – no band aids!

2.  Even thought we LIVE with Autoimmune diseases and KNOW what we’re feeling and suffering through, we sometimes feel crazy saying it out loud – because our illness is sometimes less visible, and not everyone is sympathetic or even believing what you are saying.

3.  We can’t let fear keep us from getting answers, and finding out what’s happening – the ostrich head in the sand wont help your child.

4.  We need to respect the fact that we know our children better than anyone, and truly are the only ones that can make a difference for them.

5.  Catching issues sooner than later is best – stop things before a bigger problem emerges

The crappy Microbiome I was born with, was certainly passed on to my daughter, and I’ll do all I can to help restore better gut health to her and prevent any larger issues from arising.  Talking about children and their health issues is never fun, or easy, but in this case I felt it was necessary.  I hope this message from the heart helps.

 

 

MTHFR Gene Defect

Image result for mthfr mutation

Hello AIP Community,

Have you heard of the MTHFR gene mutation?  Kat has, and Lori hasn’t.  After discovering she in fact has this, Kat wanted to share this information with all of you to raise awareness, and maybe help you understand why certain things are happening to you and your health.

 “An MTHFR mutation is a problem associated with poor methylation and enzyme production. MTHFR mutations affect every person differently, sometimes contributing to hardly any noticeable symptoms at all, while other times leading to serious, long-term health problems.” – Dr. Axe

It is estimated that 45% of people suffer from a MTHFR defect, which causes gene deficiencies.  This leads to poor cellular health, hormonal imbalances, decreased immune function and mitochondrial dysfunction.

This crappy gene inhibits Glutathione production, which makes you more vulnerable to toxins.  The accumulation of these toxins leads to disease and premature aging.

What are some things we can do to battle this mutation?
  • consume more leafy greens, asparagus, romaine lettuce, broccoli, avocado and bright fruits to boost Natural Folate, b6 and b12!
  • treat leaky gut
  • reduce anxiety and stress
  • heart health – work on it, keep up those natural supplements and AIP foods
  • detox – Lori uses her Bulletproof coconut charcoal relgiously
  • Sleep

Knowing is half the battle – this is certainly something worth knowing when you’re battling autoimmune diseases.  I know I’m emailing my Dr now to test for this gene during my September bloodwork!

Keep it clean! ~Lori

 

Meditation

Hello AIP Community,

I wanted to talk a bit about the importance of Meditation on your healing journey.  I was the #1 disbeliever of meditation until my friends, Alex & Shell told me about Dr. Joe Dispenza and his book “Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself. ”  It took me a few months to read through the book and start the actual meditations, but when I did, it was nothing short of life transforming.  STRESS is a huge inhibitor of healing, and many times the cause of flareups for most autoimmune diseases.  Stress is linked to cancer, stroke and other life threatening diseases as well.  So why not embrace something that can erase this toxicity from your life?

I’ll admit, making time to meditate was ROUGH.  But stop and think for a moment, we don’t talk ourselves out of making time to shower, eat, brush our teeth, etc…and meditation should fall into the necessity category.  I find that each night before bed, meditating in my bed is perfect – I stay awake for the duration, and my sleep number bed is far more comfortable on my back than sitting in a chair, so Voila, there ya have it.  Some days, like this very day, I steal away for 20 minutes and do a short meditation and it refreshes me and gives me some energy for the remainder of my day.

Start small – Headspace takes you through 10 minute sessions teaching you how to meditate, and the first 10 sessions are free.  Calm is another good App you can put on your phone and use.  My favorite meditations come from Joe Dispenza.  The last 25 minute section of the water rising meditation has me learning how to live each day in gratitude for not only what I have, but what I want to materialize – giving thanks as though it’s already happened, and moving me closer to it actually happening.  SO many good things have come to be since I started this meditation – my thyroid condition is 90% better,  my income has increased, weight came down, my business is thriving, and these are just a few of many examples.

The point is this, Worrying about something is like praying for it to happen. If our thoughts are that powerful, why not put them to POSITIVE use and make amazing things happen for ourselves and others?  You can even meditate and visualize disease and illness leaving your body.  The possibilities are endless, and the stress of daily life withers away.

My challenge to you is to start meditating this week.  Start with a promise that 2-3 times a week you’ll dedicate 10 minutes to meditating…and build from there.  Just like with nutrition – you’re not on a DIET or some crash course for temporary results.  You’re making a lifestyle change that will increase your health forever!

Image result for meditating funny sloth